Noctilucent Clouds 70mm

Noctilucent (Night Shining) Clouds over North Doncaster. They are typically observed during the summer months from latitudes between 50° and 70° north and south of the Equator. They only be seen during local summer months, when the Sun is below the observer's horizon, the clouds are at an altitude of around 50 miles, so are still in sunlight. They consist of ice crystals which reflect the Sunlight to the observer's location.

The focal length of the lens is 70mm. This image was taken on the same early morning as the other image but a little later on after the moon had risen. The cloud had moved somewhat and the light from the Moon and approaching dawn provided more ambient light. The sky is 10s and the foreground is 30s @ f2.8 ISO 800.

Noctilucent Clouds 35mm

Noctilucent (Night Shining) Clouds over North Doncaster. They are typically observed during the summer months from latitudes between 50° and 70° north and south of the Equator. They only be seen during local summer months, when the Sun is below the observer's horizon, the clouds are at an altitude of around 50 miles, so are still in sunlight. They consist of ice crystals which reflect the Sunlight to the observer's location.

The focal length of the lens here is 35mm. the foreground consists of 5 images stacked for NR and then focus stacked which works I think here even though it is not perfect. It was still relatively dark, the sky is 13s and the foreground is 45s, @ f2.8 ISO 800.

Sadr

Gamma Cygni is a bright star superimposed upon an extensive region of nebulosity only part of which is shown in this frame which is a combination of 6x600s Ha,5x600s O111 and 1x600s S11 exposures, applying the Hubble palette, taken on 11.7.18.The camera a sxTrius694 was attached to a Takahashi 106 refractor.

The Milky Way Core, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn

Imaged from Lanzarote, Mars can be seen just above the horizon on the bottom left, Saturn is close to the centre of the image to the left of the Lagoon and Trifid Nebulae and Jupiter is the very bright object at the top right of the image.

Light pollution was a lot worse than I had bargained on, however due to the unpredictable weather and time constraints I did not want to change location. Hence the sky has taken quite a lot of processing to get something out that I am happy with. Although it worked in my favour for
lighting the middle foreground and the sea. I used a light pollution filter (Nisi Natural Night 150x150mm plate) on the front of the lens
which helped somewhat but doesn't do much against the white LED light that came from the towns to the left. It also left that purple colour cast to the top left, but I quite like that here. It did a decent job on the orangey light on the right which is from the next-door island of Fuerteventura.

I have used artistic license a little on Mars and the Rho Ophiuchi Cloud Complex by enhancing the colours somewhat.

Nikon D750, Sigma 14mm f1.8, Skywatcher Star Adventurer Tracking Mount.

Sky: 13 x 90s @ f2.8 ISO 2000

Foreground : Focus stack of 3 images, 120s, 90s and 50s @f4 ISO 400

Sky stacked in Nebulosity 4 for NR, then processed in PS & LR.
Foreground processed in PS & LR and then blended with the sky in PS.

The Lagoon (M8) and Trifid (M20) Nebulae

The Lagoon Nebula (the lower object) is a giant emission nebula in the constellation of Sagittarius located around 5000 light years from Earth. It is a HII region like the Orion nebula.

The Trifid Nebula (the upper object)  is also a HII region, it is unusual in that the lower magenta portion is an emission nebula like M8, whereas the purple/blue upper portion is a reflection nebula. There is also a dark nebula which can be seen as the gaps in the emission nebula part. Again located around 5000 ly from Earth.

Imaged from Lanzarote.

I used my Nikon 180mm prime lens for this, which results in purple
halos around stars, they were tricky to get rid of here as the steps
taken muted the nebulosity somewhat, so I have done some masking etc....
and in the end added in diffraction spikes to hide the after effects of
the halos.

Nikon D5300 (modded), Nikkor 180mm f2.8 lens @ f3.2, Star Adventurer Mount

14 x 60s @ ISO 2500

Usual workflow, Stacking in Nebulosity 4, then PS & LR.

NGC6960

15x600s Ha,6x600s S11 binned 2x2 and 5x600s O111 binned 2x2 exposures in combination using the Hubble palette produced this image of the Western Veil, part of a supernova remnant in the constellation Cygnus.
Analysis of the emissions from the nebula has shown the presence of oxygen,sulphur and hydrogen.The nebula was discovered by
William Herschel in 1784.The shock waves forming the nebula are part of a shell visible only when viewed edge-on giving the filamentous appearance(Wikipedia)
The camera a SxTrius 694,on a Takahashi 106 refractor.

The Tulip Nebula



 Sharpless 101 is a H11 region in the constellation Cygnus lying about 6000 light years from Earth.
These images are the result of 6x600s exposures each for Ha, O111 and S11 narrowband filters taken on 14.0518 from Hatfield Woodhouse using a SX Trius 694 camera on a Takahashi 106  refractor.The yellowish version uses the Hubble palette assigning Ha to green,O111 to blue and S11 to red.

Star Trails over the Brian Joynes Observatory

~1 Hour of Star Trails taken at the Observatory, Austerfield. Aiming the lens towards Polaris the 'North Star' (as seen towards the top right), all other stars rotate around it.

Foreground: 5 x 30s @ISO 800, stacked in
Nebulosity to reduce noise.
Sky: 111 x 30s @ ISO 100 processed in
Photoshop for trails, then exposure blended with the foreground and
contrast/levels tweaks etc...
Nikon D750, Sigma 14mm @ f1.8

M101

M101 also known as the Pinwheel Galaxy is a face-on spiral galaxy located 21 million light years away from Earth.

Interactions with it's several companion Galaxies have made it asymmetrical in shape.

Imaged with a Nikon D750 attached to the ODK at Austerfield.

15 x 300s @ ISO 800 stacked in Nebulosity and processed in Photoshop.

M51

M51 (The Whirlpool Galaxy) is a spiral galaxy interacting with a smaller dwarf galaxy both located approximately 25 million light years away in the constellation Canes Venatici. It was the first galaxy to be classified as a spiral galaxy.

Imaged with a Nikon D750 attached to the Orion Optics ODK12 Reflector at the society observatory. Auto-guiding was done with Rhys' guide camera attached to the Takahashi.

20 x 180s and 4 x 300s both at ISO 800 were taken, stacked and processed independently, then blended with further noise reduction applied. Lightroom, Nebulosity and Photoshop (plugins: NC Astro Tools, AstroFlat Pro, Raya Pro 3.0, Nik DeFine 2) were used.